6 Recycling Center Makeovers

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To increase efficiency in recycling operations, waste management companies are unveiling new, state-of-the-art recycling centers nearly every year. Earth911 took a look inside a few recently opened facilities to give you a better idea of how high-tech, sustainable upgrades can improve waste diversion numbers. Read on to catch a glimpse of advanced recycling at its finest.

This brightly-colored recycling plant in Delaware can process 160,000 tons of recyclables per year and will serve the entire state. Photo: ReCommunity Recycling

This brightly colored recycling plant in Delaware can process 160,000 tons of recyclables per year and will serve the entire state. Photo: ReCommunity Recycling

1. Repurposed facilities

Often called adaptive reuse, the concept of transforming an existing structure into something new carries loads of benefits — from saving money to reducing construction and demolition waste.

A growing number of waste management companies are picking up on the burgeoning trend by modifying existing facilities and turning them into high-tech recycling plants.

This year, ReCommunity Recycling invested $15 million to transform an existing 64,000-square-foot facility into this neon-colored recycling plant in Wilmington, Del., which opened its doors in August.

In Illinois, Mervis Industries opened its new Advantage Recycling Center on the site of a former drive-in movie theater — offering residents and businesses a convenient, central location to bring scrap metal and other recyclables.

Mary Mazzoni

Based in the Phoenix metro area, Mary is a lifelong vegetarian and enjoys outdoor activities like hiking, biking and relaxing in the park. When she’s not outside, she’s probably watching baseball. She is a former assistant editor for Earth911.