DOE Means Business: Energy Star Label Stripped From Fridges

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In an effort to further regulate the use of and compliance with the Department of Energy’s signature ENERGY STAR certification program, the DOE is stepping up enforcement of the standards required to bear the blue-star label.

Effective this week, certain LG refrigerators are banned from using the label, after multiple independent labs confirmed that particular French-door models did not qualify for the ENERGY STAR program.

Some ENERGY STAR-certified models of appliances can save you more than half on your annual electricity costs to run them. Photo: Flickr/Wonderlane

Some ENERGY STAR-certified models of appliances can save you more than half on your annual electricity costs to run them. Photo: Flickr/Wonderlane

Calling the label a “critical tool” for consumers that purchase these appliances with the intent of saving money and electricity, DOE General Counsel Scott Blake Harris said the removal was necessary to “protect the American public.”

And the American public’s desire for these appliances may grow as energy efficient appliance rebate programs kick off this year. Every state has a program starting in 2010, with millions of dollars allocated to support the initiatives.

Although ENERGY STAR is a voluntary program, manufacturers participating in its efforts have skyrocketed since its inception. In 2008, Americans purchased almost 550 million ENERGY STAR-qualified products. Since the start of the program in 2000, more than 2.5 billion products have been sold across 60 product categories.

The ENERGY STAR label informs consumers of the most energy efficient products in a particular product category. According to the DOE, ensuring that the labels are applied only to products that deliver on the promised energy and cost savings creates “an even playing field in the marketplace and reduces pollution.”