5 Easy-to-Grow Container Plants for Winter

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Just because the growing season is over in most states doesn’t mean you have to stop planting. Many of your favorite fruits and veggies can easily be grown indoors in containers during the cooler months — providing nutritious and footprint-free food all winter. So, break out the hand shovels and read on for five of our favorite indoor container plants.

Herbs

Photo: Vanessa Opera/FoodOpera

Photo: Vanessa Opera/FoodOpera

Container size: At least 6 inches for an individual plant or 12 inches for multiple plants

Ideal climate: Most herbs can grow in any mild climate as long as they get plenty of water, but be sure to keep your herbs away from drafty areas of the house. A constant stream of cool air may cause plants to wilt and die.

How to do it: Herbs are the first plants most people think about when thinking about container gardening indoors, and for good reason. They’re pretty easy to grow and can thrive almost anywhere under the right conditions.

Plant your herbs in loose, well-drained potting soil in a container with drainage holes. Be sure to select a well-lit area of the house to place your herbs, as most herbs require at least six hours of direct sunlight per day. Water requirements vary from plant to plant, but in general, water your herbs when the soil feels dry.

Select perennial herbs that are small and slow-growing. Some of the herbs recommended for container gardening are: variegated sage, purple sage, golden sage, parsley, Greek oregano, rosemary, marjoram, bush basil, thyme, chives and summer savory, according to the University of Illinois Extension.

To spice up your indoor herb garden, check out these 10 upcycled herb planter ideas — including this one pictured above from FoodOpera blogger Vanessa Opera.

Next page: Cucumbers

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Mary Mazzoni

Mary Mazzoni

Mary is a lifelong vegetarian and enjoys outdoor activities like hiking, biking and relaxing in the park. When she’s not outside, she’s probably watching baseball. She is a former assistant editor for Earth911.
Mary Mazzoni