VIDEO: Martin Introduces Recycled Guitar

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Since adopting a formalized environmental policy in 1990, C.F. Martin & Co. has ben utilizing alternative woods and wood substitutes in its models. And now - a recycled guitar! Photo: Flickr/juro.ma

C.F. Martin & Co. announced this week that it will utilize FSC-certified recycled Sitka Spruce in a new cutaway guitar for its Performing Arts Series.

The wood, which is reclaimed from dismantled Canadian bridges, will be used on the tops of the new GPCPA4 Sapele. The back and sides of the guitar are made from FSC-certified Sapele wood – hence the name – and the company said the addition of recycled content only increases the new model’s performance.

“The use of this recycled traditional tone wood will complement the Sapele wood that this guitar utilizes, allowing us to achieve the same structural integrity and traditional Martin sound,” said Chris Martin, the company’s chairman and CEO.

The green scene is nothing new for the Pennsylvania-based guitar maker. In addition to exploring the use of recycled content, Martin has been at the forefront in tone testing and the development of alternatives for acoustic guitar construction.

Since the company’s environmental policies were formalized in 1990, it has been actively utilizing alternative wood species, including domestic woods like ash, maple, walnut, cherry and red birch.

The company is also researching and implementing wood alternatives for some of its models, including patented High-Pressure Laminates for the popular X Series and Little Martin guitars, aluminum tops for the Alternative X models and a shell laminate called Abalam that greatly increases the yield of abalone and mother of pearl for decorative inlays.

The company will unveil the GPCPA4 for the first time at the 2012 National Association of Music Merchants Trade Show in Anaheim, Calif. For more information on how greenies can rock, check out this video from CEO Chris Martin on responsible guitar making.

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