First and Only Compostable Fruit Label Hits Store Shelves

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The new Sinclair Compostable Fruit Label is safe for household compost piles and breaks down in 22 weeks. Photo: Sinclair International

The new Sinclair Compostable Fruit Label is safe for household compost piles and breaks down in 22 weeks. Photo: Sinclair International

Frustrated to find non-biodegradable stickers on your fruits and vegetables? Label manufacturer Sinclair International feels your pain.

The company recently launched a line of compostable labels made from polyactic acid (PLA) that are safe for household compost piles and break down in 22 weeks.

The new label can be used on all types of loose produce and is compatible with Sinclair’s existing tray-labeling and hand-labeling equipment, the company says.

The company’s other fruit labels can be recycled by consumers by sticking them onto PET plastic bottles before tossing them in the blue bin.

“It’s important to our customers to be able to introduce a sustainable alternative that is environmentally friendly and green,” Sinclair CEO Bill Hallier said in a news release. “The label is engineered to withstand the rigorous elements throughout the global supply chain, yet degrade at the appropriate time. We couldn’t be happier with the results.”

While we’re totally on board with a compostable fruit label, New York–based electrical engineer Scott Amron may have an even better idea. His concept, called the Fruitwash Label, dissolves into an organic fruit cleansing wash that helps remove wax, pesticides and bacteria.

His company is currently selling a 10 percent stake in the Fruitwash Label’s patents in the hopes of bringing the product to the mass market.

So, the next time you notice a sticker on your fruit, take a moment to give it a second look. It may be recyclable, compostable or even water-soluble — making it easy for you to nix those pesky stickers from the waste stream.

Feature image courtesy of szczel

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Mary Mazzoni

Mary Mazzoni

Mary is a lifelong vegetarian and enjoys outdoor activities like hiking, biking and relaxing in the park. When she’s not outside, she’s probably watching baseball. She is a former assistant editor for Earth911.
Mary Mazzoni